New Year, New Book: Sexuality, Ideology, and the Bible

sexuality-and-reproduction

Over the past few months, Robert Myles and I have been working hard to finish our co-edited volume, Sexuality, Ideology and the Bible: Antipodean Engagements, which will be published by Sheffield Phoenix Press later this year. The volume will contain a series of essays written by biblical scholars located in Australia and New Zealand on themes relating to sexuality, gender, and queer theory within biblical traditions and interpretations. We were also very fortunate to get the marvellous Professor Hugh Pyper from the University of Sheffield to write a response to these essays and to offer his own thoughts on ‘antipodean engagements’ with sexuality, queer ideologies, and biblical scholarship.

As a taster/teaser, I’ve listed the titles of all the essays in the volume below. And we’ll post more details about the book as it progresses along its publication path.

THE ANTIPODEAN UNDERSIDE OF SEXUALITY, IDEOLOGY AND THE BIBLE
Robert J. Myles

THE PERFECT PENIS OF EDEN AND QUEER TIME IN AUGUSTINE’S READING OF PAUL
Deane Galbraith

‘COME UPON HER’: LAND AS RAPED IN JEREMIAH 6.1-8
Emily Colgan

IMAGINING THE BODY OF CHRIST
Christina Petterson

THE MATRIARCH’S MUFF
Roland Boer

PAUL SPEAKS LIKE A GIRL: WHEN PHOEBE READS ROMANS
Alan H. Cadwallader

‘WE’RE HERE, WE’RE QUEER—GET USED TO IT!’: EXCLAMATIONS IN THE MARGINS (EUODIA AND SYNTYCHE IN PHIL. 4.2)
Gillian Townsley

QUEER[Y]ING THE SERMON ON THE MOUNT
Elaine M. Wainwright

PROMETHEA’S SONG OF SONGS
Yael Klangwisan

THE DELILAH MONOLOGUES
Caroline Blyth and Teguh Wijaya Mulya

RESPONSE: QUEERING THE ANTIPODES
Hugh S. Pyper

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Highlights from Radical Interpretations of the Bible, Sheffield

Auckland Theology favourite, occasional contributor to this blog, and soon-to-be teaching staffer Dr Robert Myles recently organised a conference at Sheffield University, where he’s been visiting scholar for the past six months. Participants at the Radical Interpretations of the Bible conference considered a range of revolutionary methods in biblical interpretations, including critical theory, Marxist exegesis, anarchist exegesis, radical reception theory and other ideological and political readings. The conference sounds as though it was a cracking success and, as Robert’s post below indicates, we hope to follow on from it by hosting a similar conference later this year in Auckland. Can’t wait…